14 GroundHog Day Facts And Why You Need to Celebrate This Underground Movement

See the Light

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Quoting an author I love, Paulo Coelho.

Those who know me, know my favorite day of the year is Ground Hog Day. Life is short so sometimes it’s a wonderful thing to be silly! For many years, I have advocated for this holiday which is severely underrated and under promoted. You might even say it’s an underground movement!

Ironically,  the days I am most interested in celebrating are sun related, kind of a strange one for the melanoma cancer patient, right? Winter solstice, Fourth of July, and yes, Ground Hog Day being tops on my list! So why do I love GH day? It’s a low maintenance holiday: no major gift giving, no seasonal decorations needed, and no pressure to get it all done! It’s our time to wish each other a Happy Ground Hog Day, to consider and talk about Spring (YAHOO, it is possibly happening again!!!!), and to see the light at the end of the proverbial tunnel (literally).

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I’ve taken to some subversive tactics over the years. My love of literacy has afforded me that annual opportunity to propagandize Ground Hog Day at my libraries, surely tainting those young minds and developing an unsuspecting following. Why, sometimes even elders understand this devotion; I  hear from a grandmother every year as we exchange Ground-Hoggedly Greetings!

Storytimes have included books such as Footprints and Shadows Shadow,   and  a reading of Stevenson’s poem My Shadow. One of my favorites is Moonbear’s Shadow and the list goes on and on. Take into consideration that the shadows we see are created by seeing the light! Projects might include: going out to measure your shadow and discussing the varying lengths at varying times, learning some basic shadow theater hand puppets, or weather activities such as painting the weather for that day or studies in black, gray, and white!

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In Fact

  1. Ground Hog Day is always celebrated on February 2nd
  2. It’s half way between the official start of Winter and the official start of Spring
  3. Groundhogs are also variously referred to as woodchucks, whistle-pigs, or land-beavers.
  4. The name whistle-pig comes from the fact that, when alarmed, a groundhog will emit a high-pitched whistle as a warning to the rest of his or her colony
  5. The name woodchuck has nothing to do with wood. Or chucking. It is derived from the Algonquian name for the critters, wuchak
  6. One of the largest rodents, part of the squirrel family
  7. Lives underground with pathways and burrows, having a separate winter den
  8. Hibernates generally from October to March, depending on location
  9. Hibernation can mean their body temperature drops to about 41 degrees (normal 98.6 degrees like us)
  10. Breeding season is March-May with a 30-32 day gestation period
  11. Litter of 2- 6 young (called pups or kits) though can have more
  12. Kits stay with their Mama about two to three months after being born in mid-April to May
  13. Youngsters disperse and leave mom’s burrow by Fall. However, about  thirty five percent of females stick around until after their first birthdays, right before mom’s new litter arrives
  14. Groundhogs are super for study of hepatitis B-induced liver cancer. In fact, if infected with Woodchuck Hepatitis B virus, the animal always goes on to develop liver cancer, making them useful for the study of liver cancer and of hepatitis B.

Punxsutawney Phil Lives

So here’s my truth, rodentially speaking, I really don’t like rodents at all. NOT AT ALL! And what’s more, whatever Phil proclaims weather-wise, it NEVER has relevance in the Northeast. We are shoveling winter off our doorstep or burrowing for the next 6 weeks and more guaranteed PERIOD! We will be demonstrating squirrelly behaviors and gnawing for warmer days!

Some think I’m absolutely foolish, others have embraced my desire for some mid-winter FUN! I’ve had staff make me ground hog shaped brownies, been given donuts with a ground hog poking out the hole, and a super-tacky Ground Hog necklace. I’ve gifted others “a just because” package to brighten their mid-winter blues (though Ground Hog Day is far more than “just because” in my mind!), and found awesome Valentine’s cards with those furry not-so-little rodents on them (multi-tasking the holidays of February!).

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Remember this is a no stress holiday! Wish those around you a Happy Ground Hog Day. Rejoice in the knowing that Spring will happen (it will, right?). Grab your seed catalogs or a good book, put on the tea water, and celebrate the day, celebrate you! Did you notice how late the sun set last night as the thermometer dipped to the negatives with hurricane force winds? It’s really very positive, this Ground Hog Day inspiration, the light I mean, not the shadow! #melanomatheskin  #GroundHogDay #FridayThoughts #WorldReadAloudDay #bookreview #melanoma #skincancer #followthelight #smile

Please sign up for my blog, let me know how you will celebrate in the comments,  and thanks for spreading the Good word! Happy Ground Hog Day to you and yours!

We can-cervive!

Janis

Daylight Savings Ends Sunday; 23 Free Things To Do After Dark

Melanoma patients have to be sun shy. Does it mean I stay inside and watch the world go by? Hell, no! Modification is key to living the best life you can. Sun-safe habits are important and now integrated into my day. But have you considered night time in your plan? In the summer, that may be crucial to avoiding high noon sun time; as we fall back to end daylight savings for this year, we have a lot of darkness to consider!

Things That Go Bump In The Night

Okay so evening is not my strong suit. Immunotherapy drags me through my days and by the evening, I am weary from this new lifestyle. That being said, consider taking a rest during the day so you might be able to do a few of these things at night:

  1. Walking is great and going for an evening stroll means you don’t have to worry about UV ratings. Wear what works depending on the season.
  2. Nighttime gives us a completely different perspective. Enhance your other senses by using them! Allow your visual overload to relax, let the sounds of the night be your focus. Or your sense of smell, touch, or taste…have your bedtime snack outside by the fire!
  3. Dress for the weather, bugs, snow, or whatever!

The Skies Have It

Consider your season and what you can do to get out after dark. Weather needs to be considered.

Spring might mean:

4.  Walking in the rain.

5.  Night crawler-ing!

6. Considering the changes that come with this season but from the darkness.

7. Meditating outside.

8. Trying some yoga poses.

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 Summer has great potential with:

9. Observing the end of day flights and songs of birds.

10. Watching lightning bugs (early July here in the Northeast).

11. Moonlight bike rides or canoe paddling, often offered via community calendars.

12. Slip, slop, slap and wrap as needed and go on that sunset cruise.

13. Step out for an ice cream, theater, or movie.

14. This meteor show, the Perseid Shower is a spectacular summer show. Seeing 5 meteors before 9:30 pm reminded me what a sight this is to enjoy.

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Fall Brings Options Including:

15. Tell stories and have a bonfire. Read a passage from a favorite book.

16. Avoid light pollution when possible and actively observe the constellations changing as some such as Orion come marching back for winter viewing.

17. Space. com is a great resource for sky information and be sure to read the dates for the Geminid Meteor Shower, the brightest of the year in mid December.

18. When the moon is close to full or full, it creates a lot of light, so star viewing is not as crisp. Those naturally bright nights are a great time to find your way around outside and get adventuring.

19. Got leaves?! Make a pile away from tree, plop into your pile, and just look up. On a clear, chilly night the smells of Autumn along with night sky clarity will have you awestruck with the magnitude of beauty.

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And Then, There’s Winter:

Isn’t it easy to hunker down and avoid the brrrrrr of it all? Push yourself each day to find pleasure in the night. Winter may be the most challenging; I know it is for me. The lack of light with daylight savings is abysmal. My best remedy is to get out, so gear up and do it. The winter nights are long and breaking up the doldrums might include:

20. Shoveling-Ha, you laugh. It’s a never ending project in the winter and why not chip away at it for a bit? Aches and pains are a reality with my clinical trial but I figure moving beats the alternative.

21. Reflection from the moon is intense during the coldest months. Dress for the weather, let the cold steal your breath away, and go for a walk, snowshoe, or cross country ski. It needn’t be long but that fresh air will give you inspiration!

22. Clear nights are perfect for stargazing. It’s cold out there so bundle up, grab your lounger lawn chair (it saves on neck discomfort), or lay down in a snowbank. Look up, look up!

22. Bright nights might mean building a snowman or decorating snowbanks with food coloring and water in a squirt bottle. Silly is okay because laughing is good for the soul and healing.

23. On a snowy night, step out and listen to the snow on your jacket, feel the wind, and stick your tongue out. Sometimes, it’s good to just know you are alive!

Finding Light In The Darkness

Modification is key to enjoying life when dealing with melanoma and other cancers. There are good days and bad days. There is pain, sadness, and loss. What do you do to find pleasure, even if you can’t be in the sun? What would you do if you could play after dark? Please do comment and add your suggestions!

Gift yourself moments like these; hope is found here. Build your new life knowing you have disease and create balance with the best moments. Cancer patients have challenges and those with melanoma have sun safety concerns.

After-dark adventures needn’t be long or complicated. Plan ahead, know the weather, and smile. Learn when the crickets chirp, when the moon phases are this month, and when that outdoor concert will be held.  Courage comes in small doses and moonshine provides inspiration!

We can-cer vive!

Janis

#melanomatheskin #cancer #melanoma #slipslopslapandwrap #naturalskinrocks #moonshine #daylightsavings  #timechange #Fridayfeelings

 

 

 

Harvesting the Three Sisters Garden

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Planting the Seed

This time of year we reap what we sow, right? Well, not always. Choosing to focus on gardens this year, I ambitiously planted seeds, a lot of seeds actually. Mostly started indoors, seedlings were everywhere. My husband found humor with corn growing in the living room, along with a plethora of other seedlings. Hey, that’s where the sun is most prevalent in our home! While I mask from the sun because of melanoma, life needs sun.

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The starting of garden ideas last January while poring over catalogs, morphed into purchasing Fedco seeds, and notes on what to plant when, which reminds me that I have yet to record the endgame of the garden. YIKES! This gardening thing is involved. Coming full-cycle, it’s time to consider successes, failures, and modifications.

Gardening is my thing, my husband the willing lifter and mover of that which this weak cancer body hasn’t the ommph to move. He easily accepts my need for help, though his favorite part of gardening is watching it grow! Greenery, life, and plentiful harvests remind both of us how beautiful life is, how simple things bring hope, inspiration, and balance; a meditation of sorts!

Nurturing the Sisters

One area of the garden was dedicated to the Three Sisters Garden, consisting of butternut squash, corn, and beans. The belief is that each of these plants sustain the others with needed nutrients. Additionally, the pole beans could grow up the corn stalks, the rambling squash could provide needed shade on scorching summer days. My sisters’ cancer deaths was the emotional piece driving me to create a nature garden honoring us!

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As one of three sisters (along with a wonderful brother), this was the year to try it. Everything  sounded so very easy. NOT! I had metza metz results and LOVE the concept of this type of garden. Throw in treatment, fatigue, weather, and suddenly, I have more than I realized to work on. What a great way to leave medical concerns behind. Somehow, win or lose, my soul was harvesting some sister love! The nuture was on, the experiment reminding me of my clinical trial. You win some, you lose some!

Harvest Moon

Corn was started in the house and did okay. I actually had it knee-high by the 4th of July. I grew bush green beans and Scarlett Runners to climb the corn stalks. The only trouble was the corn stopped growing! So we had tiny, inedible corn on short stalks that tipped over with the weight of the lofty Scarlett Runners! Winter squash did well though I still have many baby squash, too late to catch up to the larger, edible specimens.

Pondering the Three Sisters Garden, I know I watered faithfully, carrying buckets of water to the garden from the cistern. What I didn’t do was add much manure over the summer. The plants were close together and it seemed impossible to work anything into the soil. Wanna know what really worked with this garden? The idea of this:  the simple concept of creating something to remind me of the nurturing and love that will always carry on with The Three Sisters. What are you doing to satisfy your soul? I’d love to hear from you!

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Will I do this next year? That remains to be seen; perhaps a smaller garden ensues for 2019. But then, we did expand one area….and I’d love to see improved bounty… and the seed catalogs are coming out soon…

#melanomatheskinwerein #cancer  #melanoma  #threesistersgarden #garden #fedco #naturalskinrocks #sunsavvy365

We can-cer vive!

Janis