Veteran’s Day and Military Brats

Yes, I’m one of those military brats. Lots of memories I could share but mostly today is a day to remember the veterans. My father, a young World War II vet rarely spoke of his years overseas. I believe it to be a wild time for a young aircrewman, as well as a life-threatening time for a well-trained partner to the pilot in two-seater. He and his pilot, an intricate team, working closely both physically and mentally to carry out missions, to come out alive.

Sounds of Silence Or What I Missed in the Quiet

Yikes! Dad was a gunner in that war. I don’t remember when I first learned of this but I know it confused me. How could this sweet, funny, social, loving father have fought in the war, any war? My father rarely spoke of his years overseas so it took me a long time to understand.

You see, being a military brat for me was just:

  • moving ( a lot)
  • learning how to make friends and build community
  • knowing that Dad traveled often and around the globe
  • thinking of my father as a teacher; he taught air radio technology and navigation to young recruits and “weekend warriors”
  • realizing weekends with my Dad were rare and special

These were all things that happened AFTER his war years. For a long time, I didn’t even realize that my Dad was an unsung American war hero. Communication was not his strong suit and somehow, being a Navy brat meant going to strange Christmas parties on base, emphasis on NOT living on base, and wondering if Dad was on board the plane that flew so low and made the house shake.  I had little toys I packed in his suitcase so he would find my treasures when away. Wars were not part of my childhood understanding.

Lose Lips Sink Ships

You see I was a peace loving child of the 60’s, distraught to grow beyond the naivety of childhood and being to understand the atrocities of war through the black and white body bags of tv and Vietnam. Is this when I began to question what my father did in the war? Honestly, I have no recollection when I saw glimmers of what my father had sacrificed. Perhaps it was just the knowledge that her rarely spoke of his years overseas that said so very, very much.

I remember the carrier reunions of my youth, wild with conversation between the vets and more than a few drinks consumed, we kids ran wild, missing an opportunity to learn from the war discussions. I never learned anything at these parties, excepting perhaps that these veterans had much joy and sorrow shared, relationships like no other.

Over the years, my father began to share snippets about his active duty stints on the Essex, the Ranger, and the Randolph. Choosing never to climb the ranks, this veteran was in the cockpit, proud to be one of the best aircrew “white hats”. Different ships meant different pilots, training and building the comaraderie that would last a life time, the brotherhood of naval aviators.

My father felt life aboard the wartime carriers was “pretty good”.  As an enlisted aircrew, he didn’t have to stand watch, was paid $60-$90 extra a month for hazardous duty (in 1942), and was primarily off-duty when not on a mission. This all assuming you survived the rigors of war.

Heroes Among Us

My father was one of the lucky ones and fifty years after the war, he was recognized, along with 400 other vets and their wives, as the Yorktown dedicated an Enlisted Combat Aircrew Roll of Honor. This is not just enlisted crew from one war, but from several. If you are an American history buff, a visit to Patriot Point is well advised.

My siblings and I were included in this week of celebration, along with our parents, wartime friends of my father, and the one pilot of his that was still living. My father walked with a cane and oxygen down that aisle to see his engraved name along with others on the honor roll, tears streaming down his cheeks. Many of his buddies never lived for such an honor.

I know where my bravery and courage comes from and this pivotal moment with my father,  I understood. I truly understood. Yes, I’m still a peace-nic and believe in avoiding war at all costs. But in those silent tears, I felt the patriotism, the sorrow, the pain, the loss that was rarely mentioned.

My father protected our country, our rights, our freedoms. In humbly doing what he felt was right, my father quietly protected his family from the atrocities of war. My father believed we didn’t need to know the horror he lived with. At the ceremony, a fellow crewman,  Retired Captain Schultz stated the often heard phrase “Freedom is not free”.  I finally understood.

A plethora of medals, including two Distinguished Flying Crosses, were no longer hidden in his bureau. His flight logs and training maneuvers are kept at my brother’s, who has embraced my father’s military history. My brother recently revisited the Yorktown, a smaller display over the years, but a reminder of what our veterans sacrifice. Much of our father’s history went with him when he passed but we thank him for always protecting US.

Thank you all and may peace be with us all.

#VeteransDay #ThankYouVeterans #melanomatheskin #Freedomisnotfree

We can-cer vive,

Janis

PS The librarian in me just wants to mention a book that includes my father in it and is a strong depiction of airstrikes in the Pacific during World War II, Crommelin’s Thunderbirds by Lt. Cdr. Roy W. Bruce and Lt. Cdr. Charles R. Leonard

 

Vote Early, Vote Often

***I’ve decided to post this again. Infusion last week, fatigue this week. Please vote, whatever you believe in! It’s how democracy works! Elections matter!

Feeling the Blow

I’m already breaking a political promise; I vowed this blog wouldn’t get into my political beliefs. So like all those running for office, not all promises are kept! You see sometimes life changes our platforms, whether we approve or not! I’ve voted and hope you participate on November 6th if not before. I’d love to hear your thoughts on politics, voting, or cancer. Comments are encouraged and discussion most welcome!

boxer

After years of great health, I was dealt the first melanoma blow in 2015.  Determined not to have it be a knock out, I came back fighting. Until things didn’t feel right to me again, a facial excision left an area tender; my old boxing injury I joked. Except  something wasn’t right and I needed to believe in myself, to fight.

The Main Event (Round Two)

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Doctors didn’t believe me and so time went by; we cancer patients have a love-hate relationship with time. (We want more of it, though hate it when it means waiting on test results). Finally, I requested a biopsy; metastatic melanoma again and recommendations that we now go to the medical epi-center of Boston, Dana Farber Cancer Institute being our choice. I was in the big ring now.

I’ve mentioned my cancer before and will again, but not in the context of politics. I could be the poster child for pre-existing conditions. My skin, like yours, holds onto its history; its damage, whether it be sun or other sources is pre-existing. My metastatic melanoma could have happened as a child, or just a few years ago. It’s been two hard punches to the left side of my face.

So, my pre-existing condition just may have been lurking for years, waiting for the optimum conditions to let cancer, medical diagnosis, doctors and dermatologists, become the new normal in my life. I’ve always listened to my physical being, but we cancer patients feel we’re caught cold when going another round. Pre-existing, why yes I am!

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Saved By The Bell

Think pre-existing conditions aren’t relevant to you? Yes, I gratefully thought that previous to 2015. I agree that we want to cultivate hope and inspiration, not worry about the what-ifs that can drag us down with a one-two punch.  And any given day, you may be in a bout for your life, for your medical treatment.

Insurance discussion is a constant in our home, at our table now. I’m the lucky one because we have insurance to cover my clinical trial drug for now. At some point, we are going to make a decision on insurance expenses and/or treatment. Decisions are regularly made by people who can’t afford insurance premiums. Long before my health issues, I was deeply affected by those I love making tough life choices based on medical expense.

We Are The Champions

So, yeah! Vote early, vote often, but whatever you do vote! We’ve all fallen to the canvas a few times, all taken a few sucker punches. Life is like that. However you vote, at least you’re making a decision to participate, to get up and fight for what you believe in. An outcome, the decision, will be heard; if you vote, you’ve put it out there, given it your best shot!

Contenders, all of us, with our concerns and passions. Believe in yourself, have courage, and stay in the ring. There has never been a more important time to fill out a ballot. Voting is super easy and vitally important. I’ve taken to voting absentee; bringing the ballot home to research the questions and candidates more closely. Vote, vote, vote for what matters to you on November 6th (and wear your sunscreen;).

Next time, I promise not to talk politics. “And if you believe that, I’ve got a bridge…”!

#melanomatheskin #vote #melanoma #cancer #sunsavvy365 #Tuesdaythoughts #election

We can-cer vive!

Janis

Daylight Savings Ends Sunday; 23 Free Things To Do After Dark

Melanoma patients have to be sun shy. Does it mean I stay inside and watch the world go by? Hell, no! Modification is key to living the best life you can. Sun-safe habits are important and now integrated into my day. But have you considered night time in your plan? In the summer, that may be crucial to avoiding high noon sun time; as we fall back to end daylight savings for this year, we have a lot of darkness to consider!

Things That Go Bump In The Night

Okay so evening is not my strong suit. Immunotherapy drags me through my days and by the evening, I am weary from this new lifestyle. That being said, consider taking a rest during the day so you might be able to do a few of these things at night:

  1. Walking is great and going for an evening stroll means you don’t have to worry about UV ratings. Wear what works depending on the season.
  2. Nighttime gives us a completely different perspective. Enhance your other senses by using them! Allow your visual overload to relax, let the sounds of the night be your focus. Or your sense of smell, touch, or taste…have your bedtime snack outside by the fire!
  3. Dress for the weather, bugs, snow, or whatever!

The Skies Have It

Consider your season and what you can do to get out after dark. Weather needs to be considered.

Spring might mean:

4.  Walking in the rain.

5.  Night crawler-ing!

6. Considering the changes that come with this season but from the darkness.

7. Meditating outside.

8. Trying some yoga poses.

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 Summer has great potential with:

9. Observing the end of day flights and songs of birds.

10. Watching lightning bugs (early July here in the Northeast).

11. Moonlight bike rides or canoe paddling, often offered via community calendars.

12. Slip, slop, slap and wrap as needed and go on that sunset cruise.

13. Step out for an ice cream, theater, or movie.

14. This meteor show, the Perseid Shower is a spectacular summer show. Seeing 5 meteors before 9:30 pm reminded me what a sight this is to enjoy.

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Fall Brings Options Including:

15. Tell stories and have a bonfire. Read a passage from a favorite book.

16. Avoid light pollution when possible and actively observe the constellations changing as some such as Orion come marching back for winter viewing.

17. Space. com is a great resource for sky information and be sure to read the dates for the Geminid Meteor Shower, the brightest of the year in mid December.

18. When the moon is close to full or full, it creates a lot of light, so star viewing is not as crisp. Those naturally bright nights are a great time to find your way around outside and get adventuring.

19. Got leaves?! Make a pile away from tree, plop into your pile, and just look up. On a clear, chilly night the smells of Autumn along with night sky clarity will have you awestruck with the magnitude of beauty.

macro photography of snowflake

And Then, There’s Winter:

Isn’t it easy to hunker down and avoid the brrrrrr of it all? Push yourself each day to find pleasure in the night. Winter may be the most challenging; I know it is for me. The lack of light with daylight savings is abysmal. My best remedy is to get out, so gear up and do it. The winter nights are long and breaking up the doldrums might include:

20. Shoveling-Ha, you laugh. It’s a never ending project in the winter and why not chip away at it for a bit? Aches and pains are a reality with my clinical trial but I figure moving beats the alternative.

21. Reflection from the moon is intense during the coldest months. Dress for the weather, let the cold steal your breath away, and go for a walk, snowshoe, or cross country ski. It needn’t be long but that fresh air will give you inspiration!

22. Clear nights are perfect for stargazing. It’s cold out there so bundle up, grab your lounger lawn chair (it saves on neck discomfort), or lay down in a snowbank. Look up, look up!

22. Bright nights might mean building a snowman or decorating snowbanks with food coloring and water in a squirt bottle. Silly is okay because laughing is good for the soul and healing.

23. On a snowy night, step out and listen to the snow on your jacket, feel the wind, and stick your tongue out. Sometimes, it’s good to just know you are alive!

Finding Light In The Darkness

Modification is key to enjoying life when dealing with melanoma and other cancers. There are good days and bad days. There is pain, sadness, and loss. What do you do to find pleasure, even if you can’t be in the sun? What would you do if you could play after dark? Please do comment and add your suggestions!

Gift yourself moments like these; hope is found here. Build your new life knowing you have disease and create balance with the best moments. Cancer patients have challenges and those with melanoma have sun safety concerns.

After-dark adventures needn’t be long or complicated. Plan ahead, know the weather, and smile. Learn when the crickets chirp, when the moon phases are this month, and when that outdoor concert will be held.  Courage comes in small doses and moonshine provides inspiration!

We can-cer vive!

Janis

#melanomatheskin #cancer #melanoma #slipslopslapandwrap #naturalskinrocks #moonshine #daylightsavings  #timechange #Fridayfeelings

 

 

 

What’s In Your…Backpack?

Just a quick note as I prepare for my next infusion…that alone is an assumption! There will be blood tests, spot checking, scans, and evaluations. It’s a time of mixed emotions; I always hope that I pass with flying colors and get the immunotherapy that may be saving my life, I also feel the anxiety of what might not be okay.

I’d really love comments from others on what you do when faced with challenges ahead. Do you take that nervous energy and just go out and have fun? Or do you take on a project to keep your mind and body busy, expending dark energy? Do you get lost in your worry?

And That’s Why It’s Called a Nervous “WRECK”!

A few days out from the process and it’s a rainy day. The beach walk I thought I’d squish in this morning was given a literal “rain check”. Travel bags are now packed, some small projects completed, and next up will be the cats! Wow, to the World Series but it also means no more Red Sox to keep me inspired. I prefer to have bills paid and administrative duties completed. Clean sheets are always a good thing. Diversion, good! Nervous? Hell, yes!DSC01632

All of this seems silly but in having things in order for now, I expend some tension. Doing that leaves more room for things I will need while at Dana Farber Cancer Institute; it’s my emotional backpack. We all have them and when cancer treatment is imminent,  it’s important to NOT fill my emotional backpack with negativity, nervousness, and worry.

Get Ready (by The Temptations)

Here’s a brief list of what I will put in my emotional backpack:

  • belief in a tomorrow
  • courage
  • hope
  • inspiration
  • integrity
  • love

Hokey as hell but in putting in positive feelings, there is less room for the emotions that drag one down. Sure, they are there (those scary thoughts), and yes, when I walk into the medical facility there is a pit in my stomach. Metastatic melanoma, stage III, is one deadly disease. I’m well versed in what I’m up against.

Choosing to bring all those positive emotions and desires with me gives me strength, strength to get through a long day.  I put a positive spin on something I never thought would be a part of my life; I believe that I’m part of something bigger and that satisfies my soul. Cancer research is imperative and clinical trials matter.

Balancing Act

Balance will be skewed on my medical day, no doubt. There is no way to discount the possibility of a questionable scan, bloodwork values, or other concerns. This is how those cancer cells are found, this is the chance we cancer patients have. Packing the positives in my emotional bag become the bulwark for whatever this trip brings.

Exhausting, the Yervoy infusion is only one part of the depleting feeling of cancer treatment. Finding your emotional infusion may take time, but look high and low; positive emotion may just be the reserve you need to pack. Take the time to discover what it is for you and how to pack it up for when you need it!

selective focus photography of balance rock
Balance is a building process!

We all need to have emotional reserves for challenges in life. I’d love to hear what works for you. Please share in the comments as we all will benefit from learning what to pack in life’s emotional bag! What works for you?

We can-cervive!

Janis

#melanomatheskin #wecancervive #cancer #worldserieschamps #cancer #melanoma #TuesdayThoughts

Scary Masks

Radiation mask 2017
Radiation mask 2017

And Other Melanoma Frights

This blog idea has been a long time coming. There are hard parts with cancer treatment; there are parts that are nearly as tough as our mind makes them! It’s that balance idea and also, I’ve learned to not suppose, guess, or imagine how things will be.

This is written not to frighten, but to inform. It’s a brief description of my radiation experience in 2017. It’s taken some time to process this part of the healing. I’ve kept my mask in the basement, stumbling on it every now and then reminds me of how challenging this was and hopefully, how life saving it is. The pictures were taken the other day, just to show what the mask looks like. If you are considering radiation, remember each experience is unique. Ask me a question if you’d like!

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Words of encouragement found on my fridge magnet from Dana Farber Cancer Institute.

Learning takes on many forms, and this treatment taught me that I don’t always know how I will react, that I am human, and that I am braver than I think. One piece of my metastatic melanoma treatment was radiation. After multiple excisions and healing, the time came for radiation. Conferring with radiation oncologists at Dana Farber, a local team was most sensible as treatment is Monday through Friday.

Mask Making

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As a Mom and librarian, I’ve always enjoyed projects with children and teens. Mask making was a favorite, whether paper mache or natural construction. I’d never really thought I’d have my own face sculpted, much less my own personal mask!

This took place at yet another location; the measurements, the warm towels, the casting of my mask. Precision and professional knowledge are key; the medical staff of two worked well together, and in no time at all the drape of some mesh, fishnet substance formed a likeness of me.

Well, not really. My mask fit me but there was little likeness to the flesh and bones person that was to wear it. The real me had another lesson ahead!

Lock Down

Mentioned earlier, there are parts of treatment that we cancer patients don’t quite anticipate. Questions are asked, caregivers take notes and listen hard, but no oncologist, medical person, counselors, or others are able to understand the human reaction, the emotional element. Humans are unique individuals!

assorted color metal keys

Claustrophobic tendencies are not me; I endure scans, MRIs, small closets, and tiny spaces with no concerns. On the first day with the local radiation team, more measurements were noted, the irradiation location exposed on the mask, and equations exchanged. No problem.

Turn of the Screw (by Henry James)

And then, while I lay on the platform they screwed my head to the table. I knew this was coming, I knew the process. Momentary, solitary panic only known to me ensued. Tense body parts, mind wondering how I could ever escape if need be, and a foreboding feeling in every inch of my body.

Fear was trying to drown me. to hold me down, so I pushed back with courage, the desire to heal, and hope beyond this damn radiation. The staff was professional, moving through their routines with more measurements, a warm blanket, and conversation to access my level of comfort.  What great acting I did! This was the greatest mask of a lifetime, the emotional one!

Radiation treatments to my left cheek continued for weeks, 5 times each week. A friend had mentioned that he had found waiting room comaraderie in his Boston radiation treatment; my more rural setting meant less of that, though two of us passed each other daily, bestowing sincere well wishes on each other, smiles robust with empathy.

That Healthy Glow

Ironically, my face, the same one that has had multiple melanoma excisions most likely do to sun damage, was brilliantly red after just a few treatments. This “hot spot” focused most of the controlled dose very specifically. My mask provided boundaries for the radiation staff, a way to zero in.

Risks are many when considering radiation. For me, the lack of alternatives meant this was the next step in my path to being disease free. Side effects vary depending on the course of radiation; each situation requires different radiation calculations.

Treatment left me exhausted as it has a cumulative effect. My face was, and still is, super sensitive to the sun. I also have dental trays made with my dentist. Radiation damages salivary glands which helps protect teeth so daily use of the trays with fluoride may protect my teeth. Hearing is questionable as something has changed in that regard.

Radiant, Just Like Wilbur!

Would I do it again? Absolutely! I’ve always been one to shy away from various drug solutions and to work through to a healthier me. Cancer is different and fights back with vengeance, learning new ways to work around medical treatment. This time I’ve chosen to try all options that make sense for my metastatic melanoma because I need to kick this thing called cancer.

radiant
RADIANT!

Radiation treatment was trickier for me than any other part of this process and I surprised myself with the emotional challenge of being so helpless (and literally stuck!) while the immobility was essential to safe treatment. Each day, each moment I knew it to be the right decision. I learned that each of us reacts differently and that I’m stronger than I think!

Inspiration came when treatment was over, my body whooped, my face fried, and my grandson gave me a hug. Sometimes that is why we go through the scary stuff.  It’s really ALL about the hug!

#melanomatheskin #cancer #melanoma #FlashbackFriday #Halloween #maskmaking #scarystuff

We can-cer vive!

Janis

 

Tolkinesque Cancer Trek within The Great American Read

ring

Passion Between the Pages

Are you loving the PBS Great American Read? I am. All right, so I forgot to watch last Tuesday at  8 pm but other than that I’m loving it! Gazillions of book talks, promotions, displays, and story times later in my professional life, this librarian is truly loving this event.

Why you ask? I mean, there’s not a lot of bling, blang, or blood, so what’s so enchanting? How often do we have people read us excerpts, promote the words and authors they love, and remind us to read those books on “the someday list”? Interviewees are enthralled with the books they’ve read or voted for on the PBS list of 100; in hearing their thoughts, I’m excited about what to read next.

Inspiration comes from that which we know soothes our soul, and in reading books, that inspiration also comes from a story unfolding, though we don’t know where the reading will lead us. It’s a gamble as to whether the story will take us places we want to go. I’d love to hear your favorite book of all time and where it takes you!

Really? Another Reading List?

owen

The first book on the PBS list that I’m reading is A Prayer for Owen Meany which I’ve picked up from the library. Author John Irving completely captivated me with Cider House Rules so this is the next of his I’ve wanted to read. It’s proving to be a challenge as the clinical trial I’m on for metastatic melanoma leaves me too tired to read! With over 500 pages, I am laughing at myself with the 5 pages or so I read a night!!!!

BUT (that’s a big but!), the writing is rich, the characters I am getting to know intimately, and I’m finding the writing takes me to another time, another place. What better way to escape the world of cancer treatment, than to let the words take me away. Besides,  little Owen Meany has captivated my heart and I am sorry to think of his battles ahead.

Journeys Versus Battles

The Lord of the Rings trilogy is on the PBS Great American Read list. I read the first, enough to recommend it to patrons, and with so many books out there, this is my standard philosophy on book series: read one and move on! I loved the journeys Tolkien took us on but found the battles to be arduous, violent, and senseless at times.

I recently had communication with an acquaintance who mentioned the idea of journeys versus battles as we discussed the challenges of cancer. He wrote “I remember being part of a group working on a program for people living with cancer and the doctor who led this said he preferred to refer to this as a ‘journey’ rather than a ‘fight.'” Thought provoking.

tolkien road

This captured me; the concept almost alien but I wanted to love the idea of a cancer journey, or life as a journey with cancer being one of those bumps on the road. Somehow I was feeling Tolkienesque, maybe the accidental adventurer like Bilbo Baggins, on this cancer journey, working through incredible, mythical landscapes with help from some amazingly, magical medical staff. I love to travel so this sounded great!

Uphill Battles

 

BUT (this is a bigger but still!) I don’t agree! The idea of cancer as a journey is upbeat and positive; that works for me! The reality is we cancer patients do battle each and every day. We fight back the demons in our minds. We warriors do surgeries, radiation, clinical trials, and defeat the evil darklord, cancer. This is OUR fight against evil!

Like Tolkien’s epic series, we cancer patients are never sure what is around the next corner. We learn to enjoy the time between peril, we battle our Smaug dragons, and fight for our treasure (not a mere golden ring), but time. Some of us lose our battles to time, some of us continue the fight.

courage 1

Yes, the analogy of a journey is a reasonable one, just fraught with battles to be won! We do our best to not get stranded in the battles, and must prepare with courage for each assault. Our journey may be a bit more dangerous than some but we all have our demons to fight, dragons to slay. Working through this idea, I’m going with life is a journey, and cancer patients the warriors against disease!

Watch the amazing Great Amercian Read on PBS. MY very favorite book on the #GreatReadPBS list? It’s not the ones I’ve mentioned in this blog. Tell me yours in the comments and I’ll tell you mine!

#melanomatheskin #cancer #GreatReadPBS #melanoma #TuesdayThoughts #somanybookssolittletime

We can-cer vive!

Janis

Harvesting the Three Sisters Garden

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Planting the Seed

This time of year we reap what we sow, right? Well, not always. Choosing to focus on gardens this year, I ambitiously planted seeds, a lot of seeds actually. Mostly started indoors, seedlings were everywhere. My husband found humor with corn growing in the living room, along with a plethora of other seedlings. Hey, that’s where the sun is most prevalent in our home! While I mask from the sun because of melanoma, life needs sun.

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The starting of garden ideas last January while poring over catalogs, morphed into purchasing Fedco seeds, and notes on what to plant when, which reminds me that I have yet to record the endgame of the garden. YIKES! This gardening thing is involved. Coming full-cycle, it’s time to consider successes, failures, and modifications.

Gardening is my thing, my husband the willing lifter and mover of that which this weak cancer body hasn’t the ommph to move. He easily accepts my need for help, though his favorite part of gardening is watching it grow! Greenery, life, and plentiful harvests remind both of us how beautiful life is, how simple things bring hope, inspiration, and balance; a meditation of sorts!

Nurturing the Sisters

One area of the garden was dedicated to the Three Sisters Garden, consisting of butternut squash, corn, and beans. The belief is that each of these plants sustain the others with needed nutrients. Additionally, the pole beans could grow up the corn stalks, the rambling squash could provide needed shade on scorching summer days. My sisters’ cancer deaths was the emotional piece driving me to create a nature garden honoring us!

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As one of three sisters (along with a wonderful brother), this was the year to try it. Everything  sounded so very easy. NOT! I had metza metz results and LOVE the concept of this type of garden. Throw in treatment, fatigue, weather, and suddenly, I have more than I realized to work on. What a great way to leave medical concerns behind. Somehow, win or lose, my soul was harvesting some sister love! The nuture was on, the experiment reminding me of my clinical trial. You win some, you lose some!

Harvest Moon

Corn was started in the house and did okay. I actually had it knee-high by the 4th of July. I grew bush green beans and Scarlett Runners to climb the corn stalks. The only trouble was the corn stopped growing! So we had tiny, inedible corn on short stalks that tipped over with the weight of the lofty Scarlett Runners! Winter squash did well though I still have many baby squash, too late to catch up to the larger, edible specimens.

Pondering the Three Sisters Garden, I know I watered faithfully, carrying buckets of water to the garden from the cistern. What I didn’t do was add much manure over the summer. The plants were close together and it seemed impossible to work anything into the soil. Wanna know what really worked with this garden? The idea of this:  the simple concept of creating something to remind me of the nurturing and love that will always carry on with The Three Sisters. What are you doing to satisfy your soul? I’d love to hear from you!

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Will I do this next year? That remains to be seen; perhaps a smaller garden ensues for 2019. But then, we did expand one area….and I’d love to see improved bounty… and the seed catalogs are coming out soon…

#melanomatheskinwerein #cancer  #melanoma  #threesistersgarden #garden #fedco #naturalskinrocks #sunsavvy365

We can-cer vive!

Janis