Nobel Prize for Immunotherapy Pioneers; The Long and Winding Road

black car on road near mountains

The Road to a Cure

This past Monday, James P. Allison, PhD and Tasuku Honjo won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work in cancer immunotherapy. For those of us cancer patients who live because of immunotherapy, this cancer research is critical and the award brings some sort of personal satisfaction.

By stimulating the inherent ability of our immune system to attack tumor cells this year’s Nobel Laureates have established an entirely new principle for cancer treatment.  Metastatic melanoma is the skin cancer that I have. I participate in a clinical trial and was randomized to receive Yervoy (ipilimumab) which works with T-cells to improve the body’s ability to fight cancers such as melanoma.

Accelerators and Brakes

red stop sign

James P. Allison studied a known protein that functions as a brake on the immune system. He realized the potential of releasing the brake and thereby unleashing our immune cells to attack tumors. He then developed this concept into a brand new approach for treating patients.

In parallel, Tasuku Honjo discovered a protein on immune cells and, after careful exploration of its function, eventually revealed that it also operates as a brake, but with a different mechanism of action. Therapies based on his discovery proved to be strikingly effective in the fight against cancer.

Allison and Honjo showed how different strategies for inhibiting the brakes on the immune system can be used in the treatment of cancer. Different strategies, but both accelerating toward a healthy future for cancer healing. I may be just a small mile marker with immunotherapy, but I offer GINORMOUS thanks to Allison, Honjo, and others who have advanced the cause, set us on a path. Here is the scientific background of their work.

Hitching a Ridearm asphalt blur close up

So how does any of this relate to me? Us? I’m thrilled because in doing my clinical trial, my primary goal has been to improve the study of cancer. I’m not sure how it works or not for me, but perhaps in working with the staff at Dana Farber Cancer Institute I’m helping someone else down the road as the cancer research continues to move forward.

 

Yeah, I want to rid myself of cancer but I passionately want to participate in scientific research. Medical “stuff” is not my thing but through this trial, my T-cells are being driven, hitchin’ a ride toward a cure. Maybe not my cure, maybe not yours, but somehow I feel a bit “noble” for being on the right road toward a cure!

monopoly

#melanomatheskin #cancer #nobelprize #melanoma #wecan-cervive  #nakedskinrocks #yippiforipi #Thursdaythoughts

We can-cervive!

Janis

 

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Author: melanomatheskinwerein

Writer, librarian, humanatarian, and survivalist, melanoma has provided me with the gift of knowing that each day, each moment matters. Family is so important as is the ocean, both course through my veins and are in my heart! Well, that and the immunotherapy drug that's kicking my butt! Let's work through this and infuse hope and education into our lives.

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