Immunotherapy and Playing For The Win

Deal Me In

poker magician deck gamble
Some days we feel lost in the shuffle.

Wondering about immunotherapy? Some days, I wonder myself and I am participating! Dana Farber Cancer Institute is where I go for treatment of melanoma and the online library gives a good overview of immunotherapy.  Whether a cancer patient or caregiver, the amount of  health information out there is overwhelming. Take a good look at your hand, figure out a strategy, and play to win!

When first learning of the suggested path for my recurrent metastatic melanoma, I cringed. Never having interest in medical science, it all felt like one grand experiment. And now, one year in to the clinical trial, I would say “yes, yes it is one grand experiment”, and how lucky I am to be here to say that! It’s not luck really as there is a tremendous amount of scientific data and staff backing our choices.

cards casino chance close up
Chances

Knowing nothing about clinical trials (and why would I?), I did some research and felt that I “would like” to be on pembrolizumab (Keytruda) though there were three drug options in this study.  It seemed that there were some successes with this immunotherapy and the treatment period was shorter and more do-able as we traveled to Boston. Wow, was I surprised to realize I had not even paid attention to the fact that the study randomizes. In other words, I would get whatever drug the computer randomly chose.

ball casino chance gamble
Taking a chance in the game of life!

And The Winner Is…

Ipilimumab (Yervoy) which I will take for 3 years if all goes well.  Initially, there is an induction phase. Basically, for me, this meant going to Dana Farber every 3 weeks for a few months last Fall. At that time, blood work, scans, appointments, all lead the way to getting an infusion. Some times I was refused due to poor lab results or questionable health. Heading back north without the treatment was tough, a quiet ride with uncertainty about our game plan, wondering how to play this hand, and knowing there is no clear win.

Let’s ace this!

And then, to turn around and say, yes! Yes to trying another trip soon after because of the time constraints of the clinical trial. After the induction phase, visits are now every 3 months, a holiday in retrospect to the intensity of the earlier months. Basically, the same drill: blood tests, scans, appointments, which all lead to the last part of the arduous day, the infusion.

Infusion time varies. Mine is 1.5 hours and I am always relieved to start the infusion, knowing I have passed the tests for this time, anted up with hope. It all starts with an IV port for various tests and at the end of the day amazing infusion nurses check and re-check everything, hook me up, and I take it all in, every drop of hope. By the way, this immunotherapy is not a personal cocktail but is prepared based on my weight for that day.

Parameters of this drug research frequently remind me that this is about finding answers, about learning from the 1,300+ candidates and there will be winners and losers. This clinical trial is for 3 years though I can drop out at any time. The medical team will continue to evaluate me based on the length of time I did the infusions. So far, I march forward or should I say drag forward celebrating one year of immunotherapy next month! The side effects are tough for me and feel heavier this time. How are you doing with your treatment? Please comment on your challenges!

As I mentioned in an earlier blog, immunotherapy is not chemotherapy.  A Cancer Today blogpost writes that immunotherapy is progressive treatment though the side effects are relevant and more tangible than previously known. There are many options depending on the type of cancer and the study.

Yippi for Ipi, Playing the Hand You’re Dealt

Research shows that Ipilimumab has success with melanoma. The website also states “YERVOY will not work for every patient. Individual results may vary.”-I get it, the disclaimer, and I choose this clinical trial for a couple of reasons:

  • I’ve got things I want to do
  • I hope this research will help another melanoma patient
  • I’ve always believed in paying it forward
  • I think I may be more able than others to tolerate the side effects
  • I will be followed and watched for several years

I could just skip the trial at Dana Farber because Ipi is approved for some stages of melanoma (meaning I could receive treatment closer to home). When randomized I chose to continue because yes, selfishly I want to live and think I have the best team in the world, but also because I want to participate in the study. There’s nothing pretty or glorious about this and some days the deck feels stacked. Bottom line is I want to keep playing. While some see this as a gamble, I know it’s a chance to win!

cards casino chance chip
Play for the Win!

#melanomatheskin #melanoma #naturalskinrocks #yippiforipi #cancer #Thursdaythoughts #playforthewin #immunotherapy

We can-cer vive!

Janis

 

 

Advertisements

Author: melanomatheskinwerein

Writer, librarian, humanatarian, and survivalist, melanoma has provided me with the gift of knowing that each day, each moment matters. Family is so important as is the ocean, both course through my veins and are in my heart! Well, that and the immunotherapy drug that's kicking my butt! Let's work through this and infuse hope and education into our lives.

9 thoughts on “Immunotherapy and Playing For The Win”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s